You Can Call Me Saucy



It’s Adriana’s Turn!


Wow! I am overwhelmed at the responses and views that Allison’s post got! Make sure to keep following her on Lemonade Life.
Today we have Adriana’s post. We met via Twitter about a month ago and I totally love this gal! I totally think we would be best friends IRL if we didn’t live so far away! Adriana and I discussed having some sort of awareness day for diabetes. We talked about having friends and family live our lives for one day: attached to a pump, checking sugars, counting carbs etc. We haven’t forgotten, we’re still working out details so stay tuned (you can read about this here, here & here). Adriana is always listening. I feel like when I’m calling out into the abyss that is Twitter she knows when I need to hear back with some encouragement. She really was the first person my age I’ve ever had a conversation with that has diabetes as well. I felt an instant connection. So naturally I was thrilled when she agreed to write a post for my D-Day celebration! Without further ado…

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There are certain days in every person’s life that stand out: day you got engaged, married, children were born, and the day you were diagnosed with diabetes. Wait, what? Day you were diagnosed with diabetes?

Ok, so the vast majority of the population won’t have the memorable day that is D-Day.  Frankly, it would be better if nobody has to have that experience but those of us with  diabetes clearly remember  the day we were diagnosed. Of course if you were diagnosed at a really young age your parents, I’m sure, have that day etched forever in their memory.

I was diagnosed at age 7 on November 1, 1988. Day after Halloween.  The previous year was full of changes for me: mom got remarried and 5 months before I was diagnosed my baby brother was born. I guess things do come in three’s because then it was diabetes.

A week before I was diagnosed I was in Mexico with the rest of my extended family celebrating my grandmother’s 60th birthday. Before we left for Mexico my 2nd grade teacher notified my mom that I was always out of the classroom; either in the restroom or at the drinking fountain. We sent a urine sample to the pediatrician’s office as we were leaving town. In Mexico my older cousin and I snuck candy and hid it in the bathroom we shared. I’m sure lucky I didn’t end up in DKA.

Upon our return home we were greeted by a bunch of messages from the doctor’s office saying they needed to redo the test. I went in on November 1. The night before, Halloween, my parents took my candy and told me I could have it after the doctor’s appointment. Of course, I snuck some.

That doctor’s appointment changed my life. They redid the urine test and then sent us into the doctor’s office. He was sitting behind his desk when he told my mom I had diabetes.

Next thing I know we were in the elevator going upstairs to another doctor’s office. I remember looking at my mom and seeing her trying to keep her composure. At 7 years old I knew my mom was scared and upset and it had something to do with me. Suddenly I was terrified.

Suddenly my parents and I are in the hospital learning about shots and highs and lows and food and testing.

I would give anything to not have diabetes but November 1, 1988 helped shape the person I am today. Every year on my D-Day I get sad about “what if I didn’t have diabetes” but I remind myself of all the strength that has bloomed inside of me and the courage that has come from having diabetes. This year when I celebrate 22 years with diabetes I am going to celebrate it and not think about the “what ifs”.

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Thanks Adriana! Make sure to follow her on her blog – Living Life With Diabetes. And per usual, not likely I’ll be posting this weekend. But coming on Monday we have our final guest blogger. You won’t want to miss his story 🙂

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Comments

  1. * Lorraine says:

    Caleb is 7 now and I can’t help think what he thinks about how I react to things. He was diagnosed just before turning 4 and has such crystal clear memories of some of the things that happened those days. Thank you for sharing your story. I love your perspective, and hope Caleb grows up to be as strong as you.

    | Reply Posted 7 years, 5 months ago
  2. Very good story! Thanks for sharing it Adriana, and Saucy for bringing her perspective in!

    | Reply Posted 7 years, 5 months ago


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